Verified Commit 76470536 authored by Lars Bilke's avatar Lars Bilke
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[vale] web/content/docs/tools.

parent 8705d8c2
......@@ -35,12 +35,12 @@ All files are stored in
[Tests/Data/MeshLib/](https://gitlab.opengeosys.org/ogs/ogs/-/blob/master/Tests/Data/MeshLib):
- the Gmsh generated mesh
[A2-gmsh.msh](https://gitlab.opengeosys.org/ogs/ogs/-/blob/master/Tests/Data/MeshLib/A2-gmsh.msh),
[`A2-gmsh.msh`](https://gitlab.opengeosys.org/ogs/ogs/-/blob/master/Tests/Data/MeshLib/A2-gmsh.msh),
- and the corresponding result files
[A2.vtu](https://gitlab.opengeosys.org/ogs/ogs/-/blob/master/Tests/Data/MeshLib/A2.vtu),
[`A2.vtu`](https://gitlab.opengeosys.org/ogs/ogs/-/blob/master/Tests/Data/MeshLib/A2.vtu),
and the boundary meshes
[A2_0.vtu](https://gitlab.opengeosys.org/ogs/ogs/-/blob/master/Tests/Data/MeshLib/A2_0.vtu) to
[A2_7.vtu](https://gitlab.opengeosys.org/ogs/ogs/-/blob/master/Tests/Data/MeshLib/A2_7.vtu).
[`A2_0.vtu`](https://gitlab.opengeosys.org/ogs/ogs/-/blob/master/Tests/Data/MeshLib/A2_0.vtu) to
[`A2_7.vtu`](https://gitlab.opengeosys.org/ogs/ogs/-/blob/master/Tests/Data/MeshLib/A2_7.vtu).
### Running GMSH2OGS
......
......@@ -20,9 +20,9 @@ At the moment, this utility can read:
Expected file extensions for these data types include *.vs,*.pl, *.ts, and*.mx (the last one for **m**i**x**ed data).
Another data type, SGRID (Structured Grid, usually saved to *.sg files) can be converted via the [GoCadSGridReader](../../meshing/gocadsgridreader).
Another data type, SGRID (Structured Grid, usually saved to `.sg` files) can be converted via the [GoCadSGridReader](../../meshing/gocadsgridreader).
Parsers for additional GoCAD-datasets may be added in the future.
Parsers for additional GOCAD-datasets may be added in the future.
## Usage
......
......@@ -10,7 +10,7 @@ author = "Karsten Rink"
## Introduction
Converts a 2D surface mesh into a shapfile such that each element is represented by a polygon. Cell attributes are transferred onto shape polygons while point attributes are ignored.
Converts a 2D surface mesh into a Shapefile such that each element is represented by a polygon. Cell attributes are transferred onto shape polygons while point attributes are ignored.
## Usage
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......@@ -17,13 +17,13 @@ To set up a model domain, the project file `*.prj` requires additional files for
The bulk mesh must be provided in VTK's `*.vtu` format, whereas the boundary and source term domains can be provided either in OGS' internal geometry file format (filename extension: `*.gml`, not to be confused with the Geography Markup Language) or as a `*.vtu` file as well, containing a subdomain of the bulk mesh. Multiple `*.vtu` files can be provided in the project file using the `<meshes>` tag. We recommend the usage of the first method for simple 2D meshes with constant boundary conditions, whereas more complicated geometries and conditions might require the latter method. One general advantage in the utilization of `*.vtu` files is that they allow a definition of additional field variables at each mesh node/element in order to implement spatially varying boundary conditions in a similar manner as, e.g., defining inhomogeneous material properties in the bulk mesh.
The finite-element mesh must be created using external mesh generators. Simple meshes can be created using the OGS utility [generateStructuredMesh]({{< ref "structured-mesh-generation" >}}) or [PyVista](https://docs.pyvista.org). More complicated geometries can be generated and meshed using, e.g., [SALOME Platform](https://www.salome-platform.org) or [GMSH](http://gmsh.info).
The finite-element mesh must be created using external mesh generators. Simple meshes can be created using the OGS utility [generateStructuredMesh]({{< ref "structured-mesh-generation" >}}) or [PyVista](https://docs.pyvista.org). More complicated geometries can be generated and meshed using, e.g., [SALOME Platform](https://www.salome-platform.org) or [Gmsh](http://gmsh.info).
To use a mesh created by SALOME, it must be converted to the GMSH file format first. To exchange mesh files between SALOME and GMSH, one can use the `*.unv` file format. Finally, the tool GMSH2OGS can be used for the creation of `*.vtu` files (Attention: GMSH2OGS currently accepts the GMSH v2. ASCII format only. It might also be necessary to use the `-e` option to exclude lines before using the mesh files in OGS).
To use a mesh created by SALOME, it must be converted to the Gmsh file format first. To exchange mesh files between SALOME and Gmsh, one can use the `*.unv` file format. Finally, the tool GMSH2OGS can be used for the creation of `*.vtu` files (Attention: GMSH2OGS currently accepts the Gmsh v2. ASCII format only. It might also be necessary to use the `-e` option to exclude lines before using the mesh files in OGS).
To extract a surface mesh (in order to define appropriate boundary conditions) one can use the tool [ExtractSurface]({{< ref "extract-surface" >}}) for different kinds of 3D meshes. Different tools like [ParaView](https://www.paraview.org/) are suited as well. Care must be taken to make sure that all element types are of dimension `d-1`, where `d` is the dimension of the bulk mesh, and that no degenerated elements are left in the mesh and all nodes are connected appropriately. Furthermore, ensure that the element orders match. In the current version ExtractSurface stores meshes of first order (linear elements), even when the input mesh was of second order (quadratic elements).
Alternatively, the tool [msh2vtu](https://github.com/dominik-kern/msh2vtu) can be used to convert GMSH meshes to VTU and to extract boundary meshes directly from physical groups defined in GMSH.
Alternatively, the tool [msh2vtu](https://github.com/dominik-kern/msh2vtu) can be used to convert Gmsh meshes to VTU and to extract boundary meshes directly from physical groups defined in Gmsh.
Heterogeneous fields, e.g., for the use as initial conditions, can be easily generated using the [VTUinterface](https://github.com/joergbuchwald/VTUinterface) Python package.
......
......@@ -31,6 +31,8 @@ As a common programming language we use [Python](https://www.python.org).
## Supplementary material
<!-- vale off -->
* [mesh_basin.msh](mesh_basin.msh)
* [mesh_basin.py](mesh_basin.py)
* [OGSinput_basin.prj](OGSinput_basin.prj)
......
......@@ -12,7 +12,7 @@ author = "Thomas Fischer"
The tool extracts either lines in case of a 2D bulk mesh as input or
quads/triangles in case of a 3D bulk mesh as input. The input mesh can be given
either in the vtu or msh format. Since the algorithm uses the element surface
either in the VTU or MSH format. Since the algorithm uses the element surface
normals a correct node ordering of the element nodes is required.
## Usage
......@@ -40,8 +40,8 @@ and are required for flux calculations during a simulation run of OpenGeoSys.
![The square mesh consists of 16 cells/elements.](ExtractBoundary_square_1x1_quad_border.png "The square mesh consists of 16 cells/elements. The numbers in the cells are the cell IDs. The generated boundary grid consists of the somewhat thicker and colored line elements.")
### Extract the boundary from a tri mesh
### Extract the boundary from a triangular mesh
`ExtractBoundary -i square_1x1_tri.vtu -o square_1x1_tri_border.vtu`
![The square mesh consists of 32 triangle shaped cells.](ExtractBoundary_square_1x1_tri_border.png "The square mesh consists of 32 triangle shaped cells. The numbers in the tri are the cell IDs. The generated boundary grid consists of the somewhat thicker and colored line elements.")
![The square mesh consists of 32 triangle shaped cells.](ExtractBoundary_square_1x1_tri_border.png "The square mesh consists of 32 triangle shaped cells. The numbers in the triangle are the cell IDs. The generated boundary grid consists of the somewhat thicker and colored line elements.")
......@@ -10,7 +10,7 @@ author = "Thomas Fischer"
## General
The tool extracts 2d surface elements of a mesh given either in the vtu or msh format. Since the algorithm uses the element surface normals a correct node ordering of the element nodes is required. The user can specify the components of the normal the extracted surface should have.
The tool extracts 2d surface elements of a mesh given either in the VTU or MSH format. Since the algorithm uses the element surface normals a correct node ordering of the element nodes is required. The user can specify the components of the normal the extracted surface should have.
## Usage
......@@ -27,7 +27,7 @@ ExtractSurface -i [<file name of input mesh>] [-o <file name of output mesh>]
- The normal of the surface that should be extracted is given by the arguments `-x`, `-y` and `-z`. The default normal is (0,0,-1).
- The command line option `-a` can be used to specify the allowed deviation of the normal of the surface element from the given normal.
- The data arrays added to the surface mesh by using the options `--face-property-name` (default value 'bulk_face_ids'), `--element-property-name` (default value 'bulk_element_ids'), and `--node-property-name` (default value 'bulk_node_ids') are used in other tools (for instance in [ComputeNodeAreasFromSurfaceMesh]({{< ref "compute-node-areas-from-surface-mesh" >}})) and is required for flux calculations during a simulation run of OpenGeoSys.
- The switch 'ascii-output' produces vtu-files containing the data in human readable ASCII format instead of binary format.
- The switch 'ascii-output' produces VTU files containing the data in human readable ASCII format instead of binary format.
## Example
......
......@@ -17,7 +17,7 @@ mesh.
## Example
Given a "bulk" mesh (Tests/Data/Mechanics/Linear/disc_with_hole.vtu) and a
Given a "bulk" mesh (`Tests/Data/Mechanics/Linear/disc_with_hole.vtu`) and a
[quarter circle mesh](quater_circle.vtu) extracted manually we want to use the
quarter circle mesh for heterogeneous boundary condition. OGS requires two
mappings into the "bulk" mesh, one for the nodes and one for the elements.
......
......@@ -17,7 +17,7 @@ is interesting for the modeller.
Consequently, we need a way to specify such subdomains for the Finite Element
simulation. There are several possibilities to define a subdomain. One
possibility is to use a geometry via a gli- or gml-file. Since the geometry
possibility is to use a geometry via a `.gli`- or `.gml`-file. Since the geometry
often doesn't match exactly on the domain mesh, one has to specify a search
radius to find nodes, elements, or faces in the neighborhood of the geometry.
It can be difficult to find an appropriate search radius for adaptive refined
......@@ -28,7 +28,7 @@ during the simulation, this approach is not very robust.
Another possibility, avoiding the search during the simulation and thus more
robust, is to precompute the subdomains as meshes. These precomputed subdomains
are now passed to the OGS-6 simulator in the same format as the bulk mesh, the
vtu format. The subdomains additionally contain information to identify the
VTU format. The subdomains additionally contain information to identify the
corresponding bulk mesh entities like nodes, elements and faces of elements.
### A simple example
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......@@ -15,7 +15,7 @@ The tool `AddLayer` adds one layer of elements with a specified thickness
`thickness` on either on top or bottom of an existing mesh `input-mesh` and
returns the newly generated mesh `output-mesh` that has an new layer.
One might want to take care that the material groups are reduced, eg. material
One might want to take care that the material groups are reduced, e.g. material
groups should not be [0,2,5], but [0,1,2]. The new layer will have the material
group number of the highest material group +1. With the switch
`--copy-material-ids` the MaterialIDs of the extruded layer will be kept.
......
......@@ -12,7 +12,7 @@ aliases = [ "/docs/tools/meshing/gmsh-interface" ]
## Introduction
The tool `geometryToGmshGeo` takes OGS geometries (gml files) and creates a Gmsh
geo file. The user can specify several command line arguments to influence the
`.geo` file. The user can specify several command line arguments to influence the
creation procedure. A list of the arguments as well as a description of each
argument can be obtained with the `--help` option.
......
......@@ -10,14 +10,13 @@ author = "Thomas Fischer"
## Introduction
The tool `GocadSGridReader` reads a Gocad stratigraphic grid (file ending sg)
and writes the data in the open vtk unstructured grid file format (file ending
vtu). The tool doesn't change the geometry, i.e., it doesn't change the element
The tool `GocadSGridReader` reads a GOCAD stratigraphic grid (`.sg`)
and writes the data in the open VTK unstructured grid file format (`.vtu`). The tool doesn't change the geometry, i.e., it doesn't change the element
quality. Thus, the mesh may not be usable for finite mesh element simulations
immediately.
The tool is part of the official [OpenGeoSys git repository](https://github.com/ufz/ogs)
and is build when the `OGS_BUILD_UTILS` cmake switch is set `ON`. The build
and is build when the `OGS_BUILD_UTILS` CMake switch is set `ON`. The build
executable `GocadSGridReader` is placed in the `bin` directory. The tool is a command line tool.
## Usage
......@@ -46,11 +45,11 @@ Where:
GocadSGridReader -s flow_simulation_grid_klein_Rinne.sg -o flow_simulation_grid_klein_Rinne.vtu
```
![Gocad SGrid](flow_simulation_klein_Grid_Rinne.png)
![GOCAD SGrid](flow_simulation_klein_Grid_Rinne.png)
## Applications
### Thuringia Syncline (INFLUINS project)
### Thuringia syncline (INFLUINS project)
![GO2OGS Workflow](WorkflowGO2OGS.png "The tool was used to convert Gocad stratigraphic grids ('GoCad Model' in
figure below) of the Thuringia syncline to a vtk unstructured grid ('VTU'
......@@ -64,6 +63,8 @@ al. 2015).")
### Other
<!-- vale off -->
- Rotenburger Rinne (Geologischer Dienst für Niedersachsen, Referat Hydrogeologie Landesamt für Bergbau, Energie und Geologie, Jörg Elbracht)
- Heat storage model HH (Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel, Institut für Geowissenschaften, Janine Struß)
- Geothermal project (British Geological Survey, Richard Haslam)
......@@ -10,7 +10,7 @@ author = "Thomas Fischer"
## General
The tool `removeMeshElements` removes those elements from a given input mesh that fulfills a user specified criterion. The resulting mesh will be written to the specified output file. The user can choose between 4 different removal criterions:
The tool `removeMeshElements` removes those elements from a given input mesh that fulfills a user specified criterion. The resulting mesh will be written to the specified output file. The user can choose between 4 different removal criteria:
1. Remove elements by assigned properties, for instance material ids.
2. Remove elements by element type, for instance remove line elements.
......@@ -32,7 +32,7 @@ removeMeshElements -i <input-mesh> -o <output-mesh>
```
Each particular line with optional arguments refers to one of the different removal criteria mentioned in the general section.
The corresponding element types differ from vtk cell types and can be found in MeshLib/MeshEnums.cpp.
The corresponding element types differ from VTK cell types and can be found in `MeshLib/MeshEnums.cpp`.
## Examples
......
......@@ -12,7 +12,7 @@ author = "Thomas Fischer"
Generation of simple meshes in all dimensions can be accomplished with following command line tool.
The mesh generation tools are build when the `OGS_BUILD_UTILS` cmake switch is set `ON`. The build executable `generateStructuredMesh` is placed in the `bin` directory. The tool is a command line tool.
The mesh generation tools are build when the `OGS_BUILD_UTILS` CMake switch is set `ON`. The build executable `generateStructuredMesh` is placed in the `bin` directory. The tool is a command line tool.
Running `generateStructuredMesh` tool will print the required arguments and a short usage message; for detailed usage add the `--help` argument.
......@@ -44,7 +44,7 @@ info: Mesh created: 210 nodes, 120 elements.
### Output mesh format `-o filename.ext`
Depending on the file ending `.msh` or `.vtu` either a legacy OGS5 mesh file or VTK unstructured grid file is generated. Unsupported file endings will result in an error.
Depending on the file ending `.msh` or `.vtu` either a legacy OGS-5 mesh file or VTK unstructured grid file is generated. Unsupported file endings will result in an error.
### Mesh element type `-e <line|tri|quad|hex|tet>`
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......@@ -10,7 +10,7 @@ author = "Karsten Rink"
## Introduction
This utility rasterises an existing 3D mesh at a given resolution. The result is a (quasi-)structured grid (consisting of hexahedral elements) with the same extent as the input mesh. Cell properties are mapped onto the grid (sampled at centre-points of each cube), while node properties are ignored. For large raster sizes, an undersampling of the original mesh is possible.
This utility rasterizes an existing 3D mesh at a given resolution. The result is a (quasi-)structured grid (consisting of hexahedral elements) with the same extent as the input mesh. Cell properties are mapped onto the grid (sampled at centre-points of each cube), while node properties are ignored. For large raster sizes, an undersampling of the original mesh is possible.
## Usage
......@@ -49,7 +49,7 @@ The ```x```/```y```/```z```-parameters determine the raster size. If only ```x``
Vtu2Grid -i input.vtu -o output.vtu -x 200
```
![Rasterised grid](vtu2grid-200.png#two-third "Rasterised grid consisting of 9,240 cubes (equilateral hexahedral elements with an edge length of 200m). The result is severely undersampled and a continuous layer structure is no longer visible.")
![Rasterized grid](vtu2grid-200.png#two-third "Rasterised grid consisting of 9,240 cubes (equilateral hexahedral elements with an edge length of 200m). The result is severely undersampled and a continuous layer structure is no longer visible.")
**Command:**
......@@ -57,7 +57,7 @@ Vtu2Grid -i input.vtu -o output.vtu -x 200
Vtu2Grid -i input.vtu -o output.vtu -x 100
```
![Rasterised grid](vtu2grid-100.png#two-third "Rasterised grid consisting of 74,048 equilateral hexahedral elements with an edge length of 100m. The result is still undersampled but layers become already visible.")
![Rasterized grid](vtu2grid-100.png#two-third "Rasterised grid consisting of 74,048 equilateral hexahedral elements with an edge length of 100m. The result is still undersampled but layers become already visible.")
**Command:**
......@@ -65,7 +65,7 @@ Vtu2Grid -i input.vtu -o output.vtu -x 100
Vtu2Grid -i input.vtu -o output.vtu -x 50
```
![Rasterised grid](vtu2grid-50.png#two-third "Rasterised grid consisting of 591,757 equilateral hexahedral elements with an edge length of 50m. There's still undersampling in regions containing thin layers but the overall structure is reasonably well represented.")
![Rasterized grid](vtu2grid-50.png#two-third "Rasterised grid consisting of 591,757 equilateral hexahedral elements with an edge length of 50m. There's still undersampling in regions containing thin layers but the overall structure is reasonably well represented.")
**Command:**
......@@ -73,8 +73,8 @@ Vtu2Grid -i input.vtu -o output.vtu -x 50
Vtu2Grid -i input.vtu -o output.vtu -x 50 -y 50 -z 10
```
![Rasterised grid](vtu2grid-50x50x10.png#two-third "Rasterised grid consisting of 2,959,656 cuboid hexahedral elements with an edge length of 50m x 50m x 10m. The structure of the original mesh is very well represented while the number of elements has increased by an order of magnitude.")
![Rasterized grid](vtu2grid-50x50x10.png#two-third "Rasterised grid consisting of 2,959,656 cuboid hexahedral elements with an edge length of 50m x 50m x 10m. The structure of the original mesh is very well represented while the number of elements has increased by an order of magnitude.")
## Application
This utility can be used to convert complex unstructured 3D meshes with a numerically challenging geometry into simple, rasterised meshes. This will (significantly) increase the number of elements but prevents numerical issues during a subsequent simulation, thus exchanging a challenging model setup with a longer runtime. As such, the output mesh allows to quickly set-up a working model of region of interest to get first results that allow for informed decisions for a more realistic model using the unstructured input mesh.
This utility can be used to convert complex unstructured 3D meshes with a numerically challenging geometry into simple, rasterized meshes. This will (significantly) increase the number of elements but prevents numerical issues during a subsequent simulation, thus exchanging a challenging model setup with a longer runtime. As such, the output mesh allows to quickly set-up a working model of region of interest to get first results that allow for informed decisions for a more realistic model using the unstructured input mesh.
......@@ -11,4 +11,4 @@ The command line tool `AddElementQuality` adds a data array to the given mesh
that holds for each element a value for the quality. The quality value depends
on the chosen quality criterion. The available quality criteria are shown using
the help argument on the command line. The resulting data arrays can be used to
draw histograms or can be visually analyzed in the OGS Data Explorer or Paraview.
draw histograms or can be visually analyzed in the OGS Data Explorer or ParaView.
......@@ -10,7 +10,7 @@ author = "Thomas Fischer"
## General
In the process of incorporating boundary conditions of second type (or Neumann boundary conditions) into the simulation model, the area associated to each surface node is needed for the local assembly. This tool reads a surface mesh (see also [ExtractSurface]({{< ref "extract-surface" >}})), computes the associated area for each node and writes the information as txt and csv data.
In the process of incorporating boundary conditions of second type (or Neumann boundary conditions) into the simulation model, the area associated to each surface node is needed for the local assembly. This tool reads a surface mesh (see also [ExtractSurface]({{< ref "extract-surface" >}})), computes the associated area for each node and writes the information as TXT and CSV data.
## Usage
......@@ -32,6 +32,6 @@ The following steps were performed to obtain the example data:
2. The tool [ExtractSurface]({{< ref "extract-surface" >}}) was applied:
`ExtractSurface -i hex_6x7x3.vtu -o hex_6x7x3_surface.vtu`
The generated surface mesh contains a property "bulk_node_ids" assigned to the mesh nodes that contains the original subsurface mesh node ids.
3. Finally `ComputeNodeAreasFromSurfaceMesh -i hex_6x7x3_surface.vtu` generates two text files (`hex_6x7x3_surface.txt` and `hex_6x7x3_surface.csv`). The txt file is usable as boundary condition input file for OGS-5 simulation. The first column of the text file contains the original mesh node id (see image above), the second column the associated area. For example to the corner node 168 an area of 0.25 is associated. The edge node 169 has an area value of 0.5 and the interior node 176 has an area value of 1.
3. Finally `ComputeNodeAreasFromSurfaceMesh -i hex_6x7x3_surface.vtu` generates two text files (`hex_6x7x3_surface.txt` and `hex_6x7x3_surface.csv`). The TXT file is usable as boundary condition input file for OGS-5 simulation. The first column of the text file contains the original mesh node id (see image above), the second column the associated area. For example to the corner node 168 an area of 0.25 is associated. The edge node 169 has an area value of 0.5 and the interior node 176 has an area value of 1.
![Result data](ExampleComputeSurfaceNodeAreasFromSurfaceMesh-Result.png)
......@@ -12,15 +12,15 @@ author = "Thomas Fischer"
Often, meshes contain geometrical data in common with data used for process
simulation. Usually, such data used by the process simulation is associated to
the mesh nodes or to the mesh cells. In the vtk unstructured grid file format
the mesh nodes or to the mesh cells. In the VTK unstructured grid file format
the geometrical and the process data information is stored in one file - in so
called data arrays.
Some tools, for instance paraview, export data arrays always using a floating
Some tools, for instance ParaView, export data arrays always using a floating
point data type. OpenGeoSys expects the 'MaterialIDs' cell data array to have
int data-type.
Other tools, for instance Gocad, export data associated with cells or nodes
Other tools, for instance GOCAD, export data associated with cells or nodes
sometimes as float. The tool can convert the cell data arrays to double
data-type.
......
......@@ -12,11 +12,11 @@ author = "Thomas Fischer"
The tool `CreateBoundaryConditionsAlongPolylines` searches for mesh nodes that are near to polylines and generates for each found node an OGS-5 boundary condition at a point.
The user has to provide the input mesh `mesh` and the geometry `geometry` that must contain at least one polyline. Possible input formats for the mesh are the legacy OGS-5 mesh format or the vtu format. The geometry can be provided in the legacy OGS-5 gli format as well as in the gml format. The user can specify an environment via a search radius around the polyline. For all nodes within this environment boundary conditions are generated. Furthermore the type of the process the boundary condition is belonging to should be given. At the moment there are boundary condition output for LIQUID_FLOW (primary variable PRESSURE1) and STEADY_STATE_DIFFUSION (primary variable HEAD) process available.
The user has to provide the input mesh `mesh` and the geometry `geometry` that must contain at least one polyline. Possible input formats for the mesh are the legacy OGS-5 mesh format or the VTU format. The geometry can be provided in the legacy OGS-5 GLI format as well as in the gml format. The user can specify an environment via a search radius around the polyline. For all nodes within this environment boundary conditions are generated. Furthermore the type of the process the boundary condition is belonging to should be given. At the moment there are boundary condition output for LIQUID_FLOW (primary variable PRESSURE1) and STEADY_STATE_DIFFUSION (primary variable HEAD) process available.
The tool will output a OGS-5 boundary condition file (.bc) and a geometry file (.gli) containing the points the boundary conditions refer to. The original geometry will not be altered. Additional, it is possible to write the geometry in the gml format by setting the switch `gml` to 1.
The tool will output a OGS-5 boundary condition file (`.bc`) and a geometry file (`.gli`) containing the points the boundary conditions refer to. The original geometry will not be altered. Additional, it is possible to write the geometry in the gml format by setting the switch `gml` to 1.
The polylines should be in the vicinity of the mesh nodes, where the user wants to set the boundary conditions. The tool will generate boundary conditions at every node which lies within the search radius `search_radius`. Idealy, the geometry should be mapped as close as possible to the area the user wants to set boundary conditions (for this, also see tool [MapGeometryToSurface]({{< ref "map-geometric-object-to-the-surface-of-a-mesh" >}})).
The polylines should be in the vicinity of the mesh nodes, where the user wants to set the boundary conditions. The tool will generate boundary conditions at every node which lies within the search radius `search_radius`. Ideally, the geometry should be mapped as close as possible to the area the user wants to set boundary conditions (for this, also see tool [MapGeometryToSurface]({{< ref "map-geometric-object-to-the-surface-of-a-mesh" >}})).
## Usage
......
......@@ -31,6 +31,8 @@ MapGeometryToMeshSurface -m SubsurfaceMesh.vtu -i TestPolyline.gml -o TestMapped
## References
<!-- vale off -->
Karsten Rink, Lars Bilke, Olaf Kolditz: Visualisation Strategies for Environmental Modelling Data. Environmental Earth Sciences, 2014.
DOI:10.1007/s12665-013-2970-2 [download](http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs12665-013-2970-2)
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